About

THE KNUCKLEHEADS

“Have you heard about these Knuckleheads?”

About

THE KNUCKLEHEADS

“Have you heard about these Knuckleheads?”

Twin Knuckleheads of different mothers

Patrick Wire

I was in college in New Orleans, where frankly just graduating is feat in and of itself, working for, well a beer company. And not just any beer company but Anheuser-Busch. I got a job as the Loyola University campus rep. And this job is really when I knew I loved marketing because I realized it really didn’t matter that much about the barley and hops in the can, but what mattered most was the label on the outside. And learning more about labels, now simply referred to as brands, and their impact became an obsession. 

I learned about sampling, product placement, the difference between advertising in the Superdome versus pouring rights and why tavern owners didn’t want some of the amazing bar clocks I had to hand out for their establishment (the answer: then people will know what time it is and want to go home. I want them to stay all night).

I was hooked. More importantly, thanks to this desire to get to the bottom of beer labels, I got my first job in advertising at The Richards Group thanks to knowing a hell of a lot about beer. The irony was not wasted on my parents or fraternity brothers. 

Dave Longfield

I’ve moved from Reno to Dallas back to Reno back to Dallas– funny thing about Texas and Nevada– everyone thinks Vegas and Reno are close, like Dallas to Ft. Worth. Nope. Nine-hour drive. Reno’s close to Tahoe.

I’m a copywriter first, creative director after that. I’ve created long-term brand ideas for Corona Beer, Motel 6, The Home Depot, Raley’s Supermarkets, Advocates United, Wolf-SubZero-Cove, Canada Dry, and a whole host of others. I’ve written catalogs for Walmart; a website for neurological imaging; a brand identity package for a hardwood lumber company and a TV campaign for an auto repair shop that helped save the business and lots of jobs. I’ve done three stints at The Richards Group. In between, I was a creative director at smaller shops, larger shops and my own shop.

Every brand has a voice. A writer adapts to that voice. Some brands are humorous, some serious; some informational, and some just in it for the sale. While I believe writing is a craft, pure and simple, branding is a bit more nuanced. A brand has to make the audience feel something and when done correctly endear itself to its audience, which is halfway to a sale.
 

And we have free stickers. Drop the mic.

And we have free stickers.

DROP THE MIC.